02.08.13

Analyzing the mtDNA of descendants of Richard III’s mother

Posted in 沒有類 / Uncategorized at 09:17

(Followup to my previous post about Richard III’s mtDNA.)

When I posted earlier today, I was aware that Joy and Michael Ibsen who are descendants of Richard III’s mother and who would share the same mtDNA sequence had been tested as being in haplogroup J. At the time, I was unaware of and had not been able to find more details about their DNA tests.

It turns out that some details of Joy Ibsen’s test had been published in the book The Last Days of Richard III by John Ashdown-Hill (Kindle link; hardcover and paperback also available) published in 2010. Helen Riding was kind enough to post the results to facebook:

This isn’t a full sequence, and only a subset of HVR1 and HVR2 were sequenced, but this gets us 682bp of sequence, significantly better than the 53bp we have for Richard III. (There are two sequencing results because it was sequenced twice by separate labs.)

So let’s see what this reveals to us in mthap. First, let’s convert that table to a format usable by mthap and save that to a file:

16069T 16126C
73G 146C 185A 188G 263G 295T 315.1C

Next we’ll again visit the advanced options page because the HVR1 and HVR2 ranges weren’t fully sequenced. This time we want to check HVR1 and enter positions 16020-16390 and check HVR2 and enter positions 58-367. After clicking “Upload” and waiting 10-15 seconds we get this result:

Based on this, Joy Ibsen’s haplogroup is most likely J1c2c. J1c2 is pretty definite. J1c2c is based on optional marker 146C, but since we’re already pretty sure about J1c2, then J1c2c is also a good bet. According to Behar et. al. 2012 the estimated age for this haplogroup is about 4543 years old. J1c2c2 and J1c2c2a are also possibilities but the defining markers are not included in the sequence. (UPDATE 2: J1c2c1 is also possible; see below.) Note that 228A is missing, but it is an optional marker because reversions are very common within J1c.

Now, this isn’t Richard III’s sequence, but I would assume that they wouldn’t be so certain about the DNA matching if they didn’t already know it at least matched this much. Therefore it is likely that Richard III was also J1c2c. We’ll have to wait for more details on his sequence to be released to be sure.

UPDATE: This Science News article also says that Ibsen and the Richard III remains are J1c2c.

UPDATE 2: The above originally omitted J1c2c1 as a possibility due to lack of the 222T marker. Based on Ian Logan’s observations, 222T is an unstable marker prone to reversion, so lack of this marker is not necessarily significant. J1c2c1a would still be excluded.

4 Comments »

  1. Mariel said,

    02.08.13 at 12:45

    My maternal haplogroup is J1c2b (the last digit b rather than c) on my Irish side.
    My father, however, is the person who is more likely related to Richard, as he had “stuart” genes, as far as I know. I don’t know his haplogroup. I have only been tested on the maternal side (Irish). My paternal side is Scots and English.

  2. catherine said,

    10.16.13 at 02:14

    I happen to realize I am a J1c2c and had the c146t and 315.1c
    I unfortunately don’t really know what more you need to know if I am linked to this family. Could you help?

  3. Harry D. Watson said,

    11.30.13 at 04:29

    I share both of Joy Ibsen’s mutations at HVR1(+ another 4) and all of her mutations at HVR2 except 146C. Most of my mtDNA J matches to date have had an earliest known mitochondrial ancestor who was either Ulster Presbyterian from Co. Down (as in my case), or Norwegian. Not so odd as it sounds, because Stephen Oppenheimer, in his book “The Origins of the British”, has a map showing migration from present-day Norway to present-day Scotland in the Neolithic, and of course it was mainly Scots who migrated to Ulster during the Plantation period in the early 1600s.

    Harry

  4. David Brinkman said,

    02.22.14 at 23:14

    Thanks James for all your work and great mtdna tool. I am also a J1c2c with all the above listed mutations. I also have another mutation that was outside of the 16020-16390 and 58-397 search range. This mutation has just been used to create the j1c2c3 subgroup. I am waiting to see what the full sequence of the King will give us. It was just announced that this will be done and “Once completed, the full details of Richard’s genome will be published online, offering historians and scientists intriguing research opportunities.” You can read more about this at: http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/11/world/europe/richard-iii-genome-sequence/

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